Eretz Israel is our unforgettable historic homeland...The Jews who will it shall achieve their State...And whatever we attempt there for our own benefit will redound mightily and beneficially to the good of all mankind. (Theodor Herzl, DerJudenstaat, 1896)

We offer peace and amity to all the neighbouring states and their peoples, and invite them to cooperate with the independent Jewish nation for the common good of all. The State of Israel is ready to contribute its full share to the peaceful progress and development of the Middle East.
(From Proclamation of the State of Israel, 5 Iyar 5708; 14 May 1948)

With a liberal democratic political system operating under the rule of law, a flourishing market economy producing technological innovation to the benefit of the wider world, and a population as educated and cultured as anywhere in Europe or North America, Israel is a normal Western country with a right to be treated as such in the community of nations.... For the global jihad, Israel may be the first objective. But it will not be the last. (Friends of Israel Initiative)

Thursday, 20 August 2015

From A Corbyn Supporter, A Vile Message Beyond The Fringe

As reported in the Jewish Chronicle, Alison Chabloz, a performer at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, will incur no penalty for making the "quenelle" salute, widely regarded as antisemitic.

Ms Chabloz, who posted this photo of herself in action (Edinburgh Castle forms the backdrop) on Twitter, has reportedly made  a number of tweets in the past widely interpreted as antisemitic.
See also here

On her blog, Ms Chabloz has stated her reasons for making the gesture, meant as a taunt to "hardline Zionists" whom she claims harass her online.

Declaring her support for Jeremy Corbyn, whom most anti-Israel Leftists fervently wish to see voted in as Britain's Labour Party leader, she has also written in that blogpost:
 'Nobody denies that the Jews and other groups suffered horrendous atrocities at the hands of the Nazis nor that millions died in camps. It is the method of murder which is under question and if people dug a little deeper into the issue they may discover some interesting facts regards the presumed existence of homicidal Nazi gas chambers.
Indeed, the French Gayssot-Fabius law only came into existence when Professor Robert Faurisson (whose mother, by the way, was a Scot) published his findings on the lack of any physical proof regards homicidal Nazi gas chambers. Faurisson has suffered no less than ten physical assaults by thugs associated with the LDJ (League des Juifs – French equivalent of the JDL, Jewish Defence League) and, like Dieudonné and others, has been punished financially in the French courts for expressing views based on in-depth intellectual and scientific research.
“Did six million really die?” Ernst Zündel published a pamphlet posing the question in 1974 and after two high-profile trials in 1985 and 1988 was eventually sent to solitary confinement for two years in a Canadian jail. Zündel was then extradited to Germany where in 2007 he was finally convicted and jailed for another five years. Like Faurisson, Zündel suffered physical attacks as well as having his home destroyed by a pipe-bomb.
I don’t know the answer to Zündel’s question. With an establishment corrupt to the core and police obfuscation regarding high-profile child abusers ( the Labour peer and former chairman of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, Lord Janner, springs to mind ) – is it surprising that so many people are now starting to question official versions of history?'
Corbyn is certainly attracting some charmers, eh?


  1. Jews who are Nazi Holocaust deniers. Priceless.

  2. Corbyn is the real face of the left, there are plenty just like him and his supporters in the ALP.

  3. Great performance from Middle East analyst Jonathan Sacerdoti here, regarding the Corbyn leadership bid.
    Incidentally, Gabrielle (Gabi) Weiniger, who also appears, is a signatory to Jews for Justice for Palestinians.

  4. Hi Daphne, I wrote the following:

    Is Jeremy Corbyn a fascist? Fascism can be defined in almost any way but its primary contemporary usage seems to have deteriorated so that it is now understood to be little more than an epithet to be used against those with whom we passionately disagree.

    1. Thank you. I shall read with interest.